Results Iowa Home
Results Iowa Home
Results Iowa Home

HOME

LEADERSHIP AGENDA

Operational Scan

ECONOMIC INDICATORS

DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE

DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE

Governor's Office of Drug Control Policy

Steve Lukan, Drug Policy Coordinator

Mission Statement:
To serve as a leader and a catalyst for improving the health and safety of all Iowans by promoting strategic approaches and collaboration to reduce drug use and related crime.

Measures:
Iowa meth lab monthly averages
Meth labs seized by county
Meth as primary drug involved in drug prison admissions
Presence of illegal drugs in a child's body
Iowa Drug Endangered Children referred by drug task forces
Percent of 11th grade students reporting current drug use
Iowa Opioid Overdose Deaths

MORE DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE

  • Download PDF document Performance Plan - How we measure our progress

  •  Strategic Plan - How we plan for progress

  • Download PDF document Performance Report - How we report our progress

  • Department Home Page - Learn more about this department

 

 

 

Highlighted Measure:

Number of reported meth lab incidents statewide

Data Source: Department of Public Safety, Division of Narcotics Enforcement



Updated January 2017







Highlighted Measure:

Map of reported meth lab incidents statewide

Data Source: Iowa Department of Public Safety, Division of Narcotics Enforcement


Updated January 2017







 

 

 

Highlighted Measure:

Meth and Prison Admissions

Data Source: Department of Human Rights, Criminal & Juvenile Justice Planning



Updated January 2017

 

 

 

Highlighted Measure:

Iowa Opioid Overdose Deaths (including all opioids - prescription methadone, other opioids, other synthetic narcotics and heroin)

Data Source: Department of Public Health, Bureau of Health Statistics, 2015



Updated January 2017

 

Reducing Substance Abuse in Iowa

 

GRAPH - Meth Lab Incident

 

 

GRAPH - Meth Lab Incident Responses in Iowa

For larger image, click 2015 Clandestine Laboratories Seized

To compare with 2013, click 2014 Clandestine Laboratory Seized

 

 

GRAPH - Meth Lab Incident

 

 

GRAPH - Meth Lab Incident



Why this is important:
Drug abuse in Iowa has been compounded in recent years by the demand for, and supply of, highly addictive methamphetamine. Users of this harmful drug can be prone to violence and child neglect. State legislation to control the key ingredient used to make meth has largely produced its intended effect of curbing meth labs, and their accompanying hazards, in Iowa. New methods of making methamphetamine, called one-pot or "shake 'n bake" labs, are also posing a threat to unsuspecting Iowans. These methods generally use less pseudoephedrine and produce methamphetamine in smaller quantities, but are no less dangerous than other production methods. Very significant challenges remain, including a steady out-of-state supply of meth and a strong demand by Iowans who use it.

Marijuana remains the most prevalent illicit drug of abuse in our state. More potent than ever, Iowa law enforcement reports finding increasing amounts of hash oils, marijuana waxes and marijuana-infused food products that are believed to contain much higher concentrations of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), marijuana's main psychoactive ingredient. This development, combined with mixed messages sent by other states choosing to legalize marijuana, increased access and more accepting attitudes toward this addictive substance, are a cause for concern in Iowa, particularly among Iowa youth. Fifty-two percent of Iowa 11th graders believe marijuana would be easy or very easy for peers to get in their neighborhood or community. Twenty-four percent also perceive no risk in smoking marijuana once or more a week, double the number in 2005. While problematic on many fronts, only about five percent of Iowans say they are current marijuana users.

Though less severe than in other states, one of Iowa's fastest growing forms of substance abuse is comprised of addictive - and potentially lethal - prescription and illicit opioids (prescription painkillers, heroin and non-medical synthetic opioids). Iowa overdose deaths involving prescription methadone, other opioids, other synthetic narcotics and heroin more than doubled over the last decade, rising from 26 in 2005 to 61 in 2014. However, that total is down from a high of 97 in 2013. Prevention and intervention strategies are being strengthened to further reduce the abuse of prescription drugs, which can in turn prevent the abuse of more powerful illicit opioids. The Centers for Disease Control reports 78 Americans die of drug overdoses each day, and three out of four new heroin users report previous prescription opioid abuse.


What we're doing about this:
ODCP continues to enhance the effectiveness of Iowa's pseudoephedrine control law, which together with other strong prevention and enforcement efforts has contributed to a significant drop in meth labs. Since enacting one of the nation's strongest non-prescription pseudoephedrine control laws in 2005, meth lab incidents have declined 90%. In 2015 Iowa averaged 13 labs/month versus 125/month in 2004, when DEA records indicated Iowa recorded the 3rd highest number of meth lab responses of any state in the U.S. A statewide electronic pseudoephedrine sales monitoring system, enacted by the legislature in 2009 and implemented by ODCP in 2010, flags illegal over-the-limit purchases on a real-time basis. The database (NPLEx) helps to detect and deter "smurfing", or the practice of meth cooks buying small amounts of pseudoephedrine from several different pharmacies. In the five years since implementing NPLEx, over 118,000 illegal purchase attempts have been blocked preventing the sale of over 715 pounds of pseudoephedrine, averting an estimated 658 pounds of additional meth production in Iowa labs.

BACK TO TOP



Highlighted Measure:
Child Abuse Cases Involving Presence of Illegal Drugs in Child's Body

Data Source: Department of Human Services; Prevent Child Abuse Iowa

NOTE: Differential Response Program began in 2014

Updated January 2017

Highlighted Measure:
Drug Endangered Children Referred by Drug Task Forces

Data Source: Office of Drug Control Policy

 

Updated January 2017

Highlighted Measure:
Grade 11 Students Reporting Current use of Alcohol, Tobacco and Marijuana

Data Source: Department of Public Health, Iowa Youth Survey

Note: This survey is conducted bi-ennially

Updated March 2017


Keeping Iowa's Children Safe from Substance Abuse

GRAPH - Confirmed Child Abuse Cases Involving Meth Manufacturing in the Presence of a Minor

GRAPH - Confirmed Child Abuse Cases Involving Meth Manufacturing in the Presence of a Minor

   

Why this is important:
Too often, and many times hidden from public view, vulnerable children are victims of illegal drug use and manufacturing. Children who live in drug environments and whose parents/caregivers abuse drugs may be subjected to physical and verbal abuse, and neglect. These children may face short and long term consequences that negatively impact their childhood and their future.

Over the past several years, the number of drug affected children (those testing positive for an illegal drug in their system) reported to the Iowa Department of Human Services has remained high. Some of these cases involved children found in or near hazardous meth labs or chemicals used to make meth. Many more were exposed to other dangerous drug use, possession, manufacturing, cultivation or distribution.

 

What we're doing about this:
To combat the production and trafficking of meth and other illegal drugs, ODCP provides federal grant support to an array of drug treatment, prevention and primarily enforcement projects. Multi-jurisdictional drug enforcement task forces work together to protect Iowans by intercepting large amounts of dangerous drugs and weapons. In state fiscal year 2015, these task forces seized nearly 3,500 pounds of illegal drugs, confiscated 915 firearms and referred 321 children for care by the Department of Human Services. During the height of our state's meth lab activity, the Iowa Alliance for Drug Endangered Children (DEC) was born. ODCP started Iowa's DEC initiative, to protect innocent children from abuse often associated with drug use, sales and manufacturing, as well as other resources of the public health, private health care, human service and criminal justice systems, to safeguard children and hold illicit drug abusers accountable. When appropriate, the program also strives to assist families in obtaining substance abuse treatment.

BACK TO TOP

 

Questions and Feedback  |  About this Site