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LEADERSHIP AGENDA

Operational Scan

OPERATIONAL SCAN

DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE

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LEADERSHIP AGENDA

Safe Communities 

  • Seniors, adults with disabilities and those at risk of abuse have safe quality living options in their communities

Crimes with victims over 65
Dependent adult abuse
Children who do not re-enter Foster Care
Drug Endangered Children
Homes rehabbed for the elderly
New housing for persons with disabilities
Nursing home revisits
Facilities for persons with developmental disabilities

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MEASURE:
The rate of reported violent crimes and crimes involving fraud or deception with victims 65 and over.

Data Source: Department of Public Safety

 

GRAPH - Crimes with victims 65 and over: Rate per 100,000 population

Why this is important:
This measure tells us whether our elderly population is safe from the types of crimes that target the elderly.  Elderly persons are especially vulnerable when they are the victims of violence.  Crimes involving fraud, forgery or deception frequently target the elderly.  An example of this, which is a problem nationwide, is home repair fraud.

What we're doing about this:
The Intelligence Bureau of the Iowa Department of Public Safety and the Consumer Protection Division of the Attorney General's Office cooperate in sharing information regarding perpetrators of home repair fraud.

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MEASURE:
Number of cases of Dependent Adult Abuse that have been confirmed through investigation.

Data Source: Department of Inspections & Appeals, Health Facilities Division

NOTE: These are the cases reported that, after investigation, met the legal definition of dependent adult abuse.

 

Updated 11/21/06

Graph - Dependent Adult Abuse Cases in Iowa

Why this is important:
The Department of Inspections & Appeals (DIA) is responsible for dependent adult abuse investigations in licensed health care facilities (nursing homes). Measuring the number of confirmed/founded cases provides critical information to state agencies, providers, consumers and communities for developing effective strategies to address dependent adult abuse in Iowa.

What we're doing about this:
The Department of Inspections and Appeals (DIA), in cooperation with other state agencies, consumers, advocates, providers and families, continues to work toward ensuring health care facilities (nursing homes) have properly trained caregivers, conduct criminal history and dependent adult abuse record checks on prospective employees, and meet state and federal health, safety and security requirements. DIA continues to monitor trends.

The number of confirmed/founded cases has remained relatively stable. DIA continues to provide ongoing training and feedback to surveyors to ensure they understand and appropriately analyze the elements of dependent adult abuse.

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MEASURE:
Percentage of children who do not re-enter foster care.

Data Source: Department of Human Services

GRAPH - Percentage of entries into foster care: Re-entry within 12 months

Why this is important:
This information tells us how successful we are in returning children to their families. When a child must be removed from the home, the state seeks to safety reunite the child with the family as soon as possible. Yet returning children too quickly or not providing sufficient support to the family after the child is returned home, may increase the risk of harm and re-entry into care. The goal is to reunite children with their families as soon as possible, while having as few re-entries as possible.

What we're doing about this:
Through the Better Results for Kids child welfare redesign, we are doing several things to reduce foster care re-entries. We are improving assessments and family engagement to ensure we focus on the underlying issues that place the child at risk and address the real needs of families; using family team meetings which involve the child's parents and other persons important to the family to prepare for and identify supports needed when the child returns home; making services more flexible so that we can meet the individual needs of children and families; implementing trial home visits to ensure supports are provided to families when children first return home; and paying providers for achieving outcomes, such as reducing foster care re-entry, rather than just providing services.

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MEASURE:
Drug Endangered Children: Iowa's children are in safe supportive families, schools and communities.

Data Source: Department of Human Services/Prevent Child Abuse Iowa

GRAPH - Confirmed Child Abuse Cases Involving Meth Manufacturing in the Presence of a Minor

Why this is important:
The increasing prevalence of methamphetamine and meth lab incidents in Iowa, combined with other illegal drugs, is exposing large numbers of innocent children to toxic - and potentially - explosive situations. During 2004, there were 1,713 confirmed child abuse cases involving the presence of illegal drugs in a child's body. Two-thirds of these children were under the age of six and nearly one-fourth were under the age of one. During this same time period, there were also 299 confirmed child abuse cases involving meth manufacturing in the presence of a minor. These children are often neglected, abused and face a host of medical and long-term developmental risks when exposed to toxic drugs. They must be appropriately decontaminated, tested, given the necessary care for their well0being, and placed in a safe and health environment.

What we're doing about this:
A Drug Endangered Children Program is being implemented to break the cycle of neglect and abuse associated with substance abusing caregivers. This multi-discipline initiative leverages the resources of the criminal justice system, human services, juvenile court, public health system, and the medical community to address the safety and well being of children, and hold neglectful and abusive parents accountable. As appropriate, the program also assists families in obtaining substance abuse treatment and other types of family based assistance.

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MEASURE:
For those 64 and older, the number of new housing units and homes rehabilitated to safe, quality standards each year.

Data Source: Department of Economic Development

 

Updated 2/23/07

 

GRAPH - Owner-occupied homes rehabbed for the elderly

Why this is important:
Iowa has an increasing proportion of people who are aged 60 and over.  Most older Iowans own their own homes.  For those on a fixed income, routine maintenance may become difficult and the expense of paying others may be too great a financial burden.

What we're doing about this:
Each year of a portion of federal resources received by the state are dedicated to building new units of housing and making sure homes of low and moderate income persons are rehabilitate to safe and affordable housing standards.  Because the population of Iowa is aging many of the projects directly benefit those 60 and over. 

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MEASURE:
Number of additional housing units constructed/available to persons with disabilities.

Data Source: Iowa Finance Authority and Department of Economic Development

 

Updated 11/21/06

GRAPH - New Housing Untis for Persons with Disabilities

Why this is important:
There is a significant housing need for disabled Iowans with extremely low incomes. There is also a shortage of physically accessible units in Iowa.

What we're doing about this:
During the spring of 2003, the Vilsack-Pedersen administration established a goal of establishing 1,000 new housing units for persons with disabilities during the remainder of their term. The Iowa Finance Authority and the Iowa Department of Economic Development are working to increase the supply of housing units for persons with disabilities through housing programs such as the Multifamily Housing Loan, Low-Income Housing Tax Credit, IDED Housing Fund, the State Housing Trust Fund, Iowa Able Foundation for Home Modification Loan Program, Shelter Plus Care, etc. In FY06, the 1,000 unit target was exceeded by 82 units.

As of 9-30-06, the cumulative number of units is 1,262 which includes the Housing Opportunities for Persons with Aids (HOPWA) units which were not previously included.

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MEASURE:
Percentage of licensed/certified health care facilities requiring a second revisit.

Data Source: Department of Inspections & Appeals, Health Facilities Division

 

Updated 11/21/06

GRAPH - Percentage of licensed/certified health care facilities requiring a second revisit

Why this is important:
This measure shows, in part, the compliance level of facilities. Compliance is an indicator of quality resident care. Even if a facility has violations, if they timely correct them, multiple reinspections are unnecessary. This allows department inspection staff to focus on other routine inspections and on complaint investigations.

What we're doing about this:
Percentage may vary due to compliance history of facilities inspected during the reporting period. The department continues to monitor the trends for this indicator.

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MEASURE:
Percentage of facilities serving developmentally disabled persons that are free of violations.

Data Source: Department of Inspections & Appeals, Health Facilities Division

 

Updated 11/21/06

GRAPH - Percentage of habilitation facilities free of deficiencies

Why this is important:
This measure shows, in part, the compliance level of facilities serving persons with developmental disabilities. Compliance is an indicator of quality resident care. For a facility to have no violations is a good indicator of the quality care and services the residents are receiving.

What we're doing about this:
Percentage may vary due to compliance history and the specific facilities inspected during the reporting period. The department continues to monitor the trends for this indicator. The department formally recognizes facilities with violation-free inspections by sending a letter of recognition from the director to the administrator.

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