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LEADERSHIP AGENDA

Operational Scan

ECONOMIC INDICATORS

DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE

DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE

Transportation

Paul Trombino, Director

Mission Statement:
Delivering a modern transportation system that provides pathways for the social and economic vitality of Iowa, increases safety and maximizes customer satisfaction.

Measures:
Miles of new paved shoulders
Non-committed right of way parcels
Sufficiency ratings

MORE DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE

  • Download PDF document Performance Plan - How we measure our progress

  • Download PDF document Strategic Plan - How we plan for progress

  • Download PDF document Performance Report- How we report our progress

  • Department Home Page - Learn more about this department

Highlighted Measure:

Shoulder miles of new paved shoulders awarded for construction on the primary highway system.

Data source: Dept. of Transportation, Office of Traffic & Safety, Highway Division - Systems Operations Bureau

NOTE: Quarterly values are cumulative

Updated 04/27/2016

Why this is important:
An incentive started in FY05, paving shoulders is designed to make Iowa roads safer. Statistics show that from 2009-2013, an average of 40% of roadway fatalities in Iowa involved single-vehicle, run-off-the-road crashes.


What we're doing about this:
Focus will be on construction and rehabilitation projects awarded for work on heavily used portions of the Primary Highway System. The goal over time is to provide paved shoulders on the National Highway System and other portions of the Primary Highway System with an annual average daily traffic count of 3,000 or more. With the addition of approximately 5,100 miles of paved shoulders from fiscal years 2005 through 2015, a total of nearly 10,097 miles of eligible shoulder-miles are now paved.

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Highlighted Measure:

Dollar value of all non-committed right-of-way parcels sold and returned to private, commercial, or other public uses.

Data Source: Dept. of Transportation, Office of Right of Way, Highway Division-Project Delivery Bureau

NOTE: Quarterly values are cumulative


Updated 04/27/2016

 

GRAPH - Responsible Stewardship Through Property Management

Why this is important:
Disposal of land no longer required for highway purposes maximizes productivity of Iowa's most precious natural resource - land. Converting unrequired right-of-way to new ownership shifts the land from a state government maintenance expense to a wide array of opportunities such as private use, economic development, or broader public use by other public entities.


What we're doing about this:
The variability of resources, the need to preserve options throughout the highway planning process, and a wide variety of potential uses for non-committed parcels make flexibility a key in providing responsible stewardship of land. To help maintain the optimum balance in such a fluid environment, the property management section within the Office of Right of Way administers the number of parcels and acres sold, as well as funds generated in a way that minimizes the amount of noncommitted right of way held by the department. In fiscal years 2007 through 2015, sale of noncommitted parcels returned $22.3 million to the Primary Road Fund.

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Highlighted Measure:

Percent of highway miles that meet or exceed an acceptable sufficiency rating.

Data Source: Dept. of Transportation, Planning, Programming & Modal Division

 

NOTE: Data reported annually

 

Updated 08/07/2015

Graph

Why this is important:
The sufficiency rating evaluates a highway segment's ability to safely carry traffic and is a tool used to identify needed highway improvements by taking into account condition, geometrics, traffic volume, crash history and other factors. Iowans use highways to get to work, school, health-care and recreation; to purchase goods and services; and to maintain connections with family and friends. Vital for a healthy Iowa economy, the highway system supports the movement of goods across the state, the Midwest, the country and to international markets. Freight movements on Iowa roadways are expected to grow over 40 percent by 2040.


What we're doing about this:
The sufficiency rating is a measure of a highway's ability to safely and efficiently move traffic. The department utilizes sufficiency ratings as a tool to identify roadways that should be considered for resurfacing, reconstruction, or added capacity. With the increase in highway funding signed into law in February 2015, approximately $100 million in additional funding per year is available for roadway and bridge improvements on the Primary Highway System. This will result in an overall increase in sufficiency ratings of the Primary Highway System and therefore improve the performance of the highway system.

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